4.2 Development Strategy

closeddate_range22 Dec, 2020, 9:00am - 12 Mar, 2021, 5:00pm

4.2 Development Strategy

The NPF and the RSES are high-level documents that will shape growth and development in Ireland and the Southern Region up to the year 2040.  The specific focus of this Development Plan is a quantitatively based Core Strategy, which sets the framework for the spatial development of the County to 2027, within a medium to longer term context.  The Core Strategy must demonstrate that the Development Plan and its objectives are consistent with national and regional development objectives set out in the NPF and RSES.  Specifically, the first Regional Strategy (2020-2032) sets the parameters for the City and County Development Plan to cover the period to 2027 and 2031.

The ambition of the NPF is to create a single vision, a shared set of goals for every community across the country. These goals are expressed as National Strategic Outcomes (See Figure 4.1).  It is an approach that joins up ambition for improvement across the different areas of our lives, bringing the various government departments, agencies, State owned enterprises and local authorities together behind a shared set of strategic objectives for rural, regional and urban development[1].

National Strategic Outcomes

Figure 4.1: NPF National Strategic Outcomes. Source: NPF, p13

The NPF is fully supported by the Government’s investment strategy for public capital investment and investment by the State sector in general through its 10-year National investment Plan, the NDP 2018-2027.  The Implementation Roadmap for the National Planning Framework[2] highlights the Government’s focus on achieving alignment between national, regional and local planning policy and practice.  The Roadmap provides transitional population projections at a regional and county scale.

At a Regional Level these 10 National Outcomes are set out by the 11 Statements of the Strategy to build a Strong, Resilient and Sustainable Southern Region[3]

This Development Plan and its Core Strategy seeks to achieve consistency with the National Strategic Outcomes of the NPF and Statement of Strategy of the RSES.

The County Core Strategy is based on projections contained in both the NPF’s Implementation Roadmap and Appendix 1 to the RSES.  Accordingly, this Development Plan will set out to cater for Kilkenny County’s population to increase from 99,232 in 2016 to between 108,000 -110,000 by 2026 and between 112,000 -114,500 by 2031.  That will be a growth of 11,000 by 2027 and by over 15,000 at the higher end of projections by 2031.  This is set out below in Table 4.1. 

Table 4.1: Population Projections at Regional and County level

South-East Planning Area

2016

2026

2031

Kilkenny

99,000

108,000-110,000

112,000-114,500

Waterford

116,000

132,000-135,000

137,000-144,000

Wexford

149,000

163,000-166,000

169,000-172,500

Tipperary SR

88,500

96,000-98,000

99,500-102,000

Carlow

57,000

62,000-63,000

64,000-65,500

Total

509,500

561,000-572,000

581,500-598,500

For the purpose of this Plan, the time period will be to 2027.  Growth is anticipated to take place towards the upper levels of the projections and growth is assumed to be linear.  The revised calculations to 2027 are set out below in Table 4.2.

Table 4.2: Census and Adjusted NPF population projections

 

2011 

2016

2026

2027

Uplift 2016-2027

To 2031

Kilkenny County

95,419

99,232

110,000

111,077

11,845

114,500

Kilkenny City

24,423

26,512

29,822

30,153

3,641

31,477

Ferrybank/Belview[4]

4,787[5]

5,288

6,608

6,740

1,452

7,268

It is important to note that the population targets set out in the NPF and RSES are based on the period 2016 to 2026.  Accordingly, the projected NPF figures have been adjusted to align with the period of this Plan to 2027 i.e. an increase of 11,845 for the County.  The figure for 2027 is derived from applying the annual average increase predicted by the NPF to 2026 and extrapolating same to 2027.

It is an objective of the NPF (National Planning Objectives 3a,3b and 3c) that targeted growth will be delivered in a compact form, with 40% of all new homes nationally to be provided within the built-up footprint of existing settlements.  Of the growth targeted for settlements, 30% is to be provided within the existing built footprint[6].

The exception to this rule is the Waterford Metropolitan Area Strategic Plan (MASP) area, which contains Ferrybank and environs, where 50% of new housing growth for Waterford City is to be delivered within the existing built-up footprint.

 

[1] NPF: Foreword to the National Planning Framework P5

[2] Implementation Roadmap for the National Planning Framework, Dept. of Housing Planning and Local Government, July 2018

[3] Regional Spatial & Economic Strategy for the Southern Region p24

[4] The Ferrybank/Belview LAP is the statutory planning document until 2023. The RSES confirms these figures subject to agreement between WCCC & KCC on any revisions locally. WCCC has commenced the preparation of a new Development Plan.

[5] The population increase allocated to the Environs of Waterford is 1,000 people from 2010 to 2016, a rate of 166.6 per year. This figure is for the Kilculliheen & Aglish EDs only, it does not relate to the entire Ferrybank/Belview Local Area Plan area. 

[6] This means within the existing built-up footprint of all sizes of urban settlement, as defined by the CSO in line with UN criteria i.e. having a minimum of 50 occupied dwellings, with a maximum distance between any dwelling and the building closest to it of 100 metres, and where there is evidence of an urban centre (shop, school etc.).

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