2. Core Strategy

Dúntadate_range22 Nol, 2020, 9:00am - 12 Már, 2021, 5:00pm

2. Core Strategy

Volume 1 has set out the overarching policy direction for the City & County for the spatial and economic development of the City & County.  Kilkenny City and Ferrybank/Belview along with the District towns, are identified as the main locations for employment and population growth.

Kilkenny city is of sufficient scale with the potential for significant growth to require a Core Strategy[1].   In preparing a Core Strategy, the Council has had regard to the national and regional policy context in terms of climate change, settlement patterns and potential population growth targets.  The City Core Strategy sets out an evidence-based rationale for the City area. 

2.1 Population Forecasts

The population targets for the City are set by the Implementation Roadmap for the National Planning Framework and the Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy. The objective is to grow the population of the City by 30% to 2040. 

This figure is further refined and averaged out over the plan period 2021 – 2027 and set out below in Table 2.1.

Table 2.1 National Planning Framework population projections

 

2016

NPF 2026

2027

Uplift from 2016

2031

Kilkenny County

99,232

110,000

111,077

11,845

114,500

Kilkenny City

26,512

29,822

30,153

3,641

31,477

 

2.2 Kilkenny City Core Strategy

The Kilkenny City Core Strategy is based on the following principles:

  • National/Regional/Local Policy Context (i.e. inter alia the NPF, RSES, in particular the concept of compact growth)
  • The concept of developing a 10-minute City[2],
  • The four neighbourhood concept for Kilkenny city
  • Demographic and socio‐economic trends outlined in Volume 1, Chapter 3
  • Assessment of need for housing
  • Water, wastewater, drainage and road infrastructure (existing and planned)
  • Flood Risk Assessment
  • Supporting infrastructure (social, community and commercial, both existing and planned)
  • Physical suitability of land including factors such as topography and ease of access
  • Environmental policy (ground and surface water quality, flooding, etc.)
  • Sequential approach to development (zoning should extend outwards from the core of an urban area, with undeveloped lands closest to the core and public transport routes being given preference. In addition, areas to be zoned should be contiguous to existing zoned development lands).  This also applies in neighbourhoods, where development should take place in accordance with the principles/phasing of the masterplan. 
  • Existing planning permissions within the development boundary of the City
2.2.1 Land Requirement

The Core Strategy Table in Volume 1, Chapter 4 sets out the land requirement for the City and this is repeated here for convenience.

 

Table 2.2: City Core Strategy 2016-2027

 

 

 

 

(1)

Core Strategy population allocation 2016 - 2027

 

(2)

Density

 

 

 

(3)

Housing

units

 Housing land required to 2027

(4)

Compliance with NPO 3C

 

(5)

Zoning

proposed

(Hectares)

(6)

County Kilkenny

11,842

 

 

 

 

 

Kilkenny City

3,641

35/Ha

1,324

37.8[3]

(30%) inside CSO boundary 11.3Ha[4]

and

(70%) outside CSO boundary 26.5Ha

 

39.46Ha outside

               

The RSES[5]  target growth for the City of more than 30% by 2040 from the base year of 2016.  This has been adopted by the Council, reflecting the ambition of the local authority and the historically strong growth performance of the City.

From National Policy Objective 3c of the NPF, 30% of the new housing earmarked for the City must be catered for within the existing built-up footprint i.e. within the 2016 CSO boundary for the City[6], requiring approximately 11.3Ha. Within the CSO boundary the following is identified to satisfy that demand.

•             Lands subject to the vacant site levy = 19.77Ha

•             Abbey Quarter = 4.41Ha (residential 30%-35%)

•             Mixed Use zoning = 25.79ha

Notwithstanding this requirement it is proposed to zone 39.46ha on greenfield lands outside the CSO boundary (See Section 2.2.5 Development Strategy below).

2.2.2 Distribution of Housing Land requirement

The four-neighbourhood model as set out in the last two Development Plans, to accommodate expansion around the existing city, continues to be appropriate for Kilkenny.  The four areas identified for the development of neighbourhoods were (See Figure CS2 Core Strategy):

1. Loughboy/Archerstreet

2. Newpark Upper/Eastern Environs

3. Poulgour/Wetlands/Western Environs (now known as Breagagh Valley)

4. Loughmacask

As Loughboy/Archerstreet and Newpark Upper are substantially built out and are incorporated into the built up area of the City, as defined by the CSO, the two remaining areas of the Breagagh Valley (formerly Western Environs) and Loughmacask will be the focus for greenfield development over the plan period. The majority of these areas are located outside the built-up area but are immediately contiguous to it.  Both of these areas were the subject of Local Area Plans in the past.

2.2.3 Breagagh Valley

A Local Area Plan (LAP) was prepared for this area (formerly known as the Western Environs) in 2004. The Local Area Plan was reviewed and modified for incorporation in the last two Development Plans for the City.  The principles set out in the LAP, such as the basic road structure, the housing densities (35 units per hectare on average) and the distribution of land uses has remained broadly in line with the original concepts.  In the LAP, the area was divided into development parcels and the development of those parcels was linked to the provision of necessary infrastructure.  A limited amount of housing was developed within the LAP area since 2004 but due to lack of services and the economic crash of 2008, development of housing stalled.

To date two parcels of land (P & Q) have been partially development with an additional parcel (E) having the benefit of permission for housing development.  The area has been incorporated into the overall phasing of land in the zoning map (see Figure CS4 Breagagh Valley). 

A link road to release land for development in the area was subject to funding under the Rebuilding Ireland programme in 2016.  The scheme extends to 2.3km in length and includes for a new distributor road from the N76 Callan Road to the Circular Road at Robertshill, widening of the existing Circular Road from Robertshill to its junction with the Kilmanagh Road, and widening of the R695 Kilmanagh Road to Drakelands. The scheme is being jointly funded by Kilkenny County Council, and the Department of Housing, Planning, and Local Government under the Local Infrastructure Housing Activation Fund (LIHAF) section of the Rebuilding Ireland programme.  Works are set to be completed in 2021.  The scheme will also deliver a portion of the Breagagh linear park in that area.

 

Table 2.3: Development Criteria for land in Breagagh Valley

 

Parcel  name

Area in  hectares (gross)

Character  of area

The following Infrastructure must be in place before this parcel can develop

The following non-residential facilities must be in place within the plan area before housing can be developed in this parcel

This Parcel Must Contain

This Parcel May Contain

 
 

Block E  

 3.90  

Higher Density Residential  

  1. Upgrade of Kilmanagh Road between Point ‘29’ and Point ‘39’
  2. Inner Relief Road/Circular Rd. between Point ‘’22’ and Point 29’
  3. Inner Relief Road/Circular Rd. between Point ‘’22’ and Point 3’
  4. Distributor Road between Point ’37 and Point ‘26’
  5. Foul drainage and water supply infrastructure to be approved by Irish Water and subject to connection agreement..
  6. Surface water sewers designed and  approved by the Local Authority.
  7. Surface water drains, gas, electricity, TV and telecom services to serve the development.  

 

Residential development at a mean density of 36-40 residential units/hectare (14.5-16/acre)

Open Space area laid out and landscaped (incorporating a play area) and with a management agreement in place to the satisfaction of the planning authority to  the Development Plan requirements  

Bed and breakfast/guesthouse

Clinic or surgery Community facilities Convenience store(s) of not more than 100 m sq. gross floor area.

Crèche and/or playgroup

Halting site/group housing scheme Hotel, public house, restaurant, café Live/work units and small workshops Public service installation Retirement and/or nursing home  

 

Block P  

 12.70  

Medium/Higher Density Residential  

  1. Upgrade of the Callan Rd. from Point ‘3’ to Point ’5’.
  2. Distributor road from point ‘7’ to Point ‘10’
  3. Distributor road from Point ‘8’ to Point ‘11’.
  4. Inner Relief Road from Point ‘3’ to point ‘12’.
  5. Foul drainage and water supply infrastructure to be approved by Irish Water and subject to connection agreement..
  6. Surface water designed and  approved by the Local Authority and delivered in tandem with development proposal
  7. Gas, electricity, TV and telecom services to serve the development.  

Either open space area P2, with title transferred to the local authority, laid out and landscaped to the satisfaction of the planning authorities.  

Residential development at a mean density of 33-40 residential units/hectare (13-16/acre)

 

A crèche or other pre-school facility

 

Open Space LP7, laid out and landscaped (incorporating a play area) and with a management agreement in place to the satisfaction of the planning authority.  

Bed and breakfast/guesthouse

Clinic or surgery Community facilities Convenience store(s) of not more than 100 m sq. gross floor area.

Crèche and/or playgroup

Halting site/group housing scheme Hotel, public house, restaurant, café Live/work units and small workshops Public service installation Retirement and/or nursing home.  

 

Block Q  

 8.25  

Medium Density Residential  

  1. Upgrade of the Callan Rd. from Point ‘1’ to Point ’5’.
  2. Distributor road from Point ‘2’ to Point ‘7’.
  3. Foul drainage and water supply infrastructure to be approved by Irish Water and subject to connection agreement..

 

  1. Surface water  designed and  approved by the Local Authority and delivered in tandem with development proposal
  2. Gas, electricity, TV and telecom services to serve the development.  

 

Residential development at a mean density of 33-36 residential units/hectare (13-14.5/acre)

A crèche or other pre-school facility

Open Space LP6, laid out and landscaped (incorporating a play area) and with a management agreement in place to the satisfaction of the planning authority.  

Bed and breakfast/guesthouse

Clinic or surgery Community facilities Convenience store(s) of not more than 100 m sq. gross floor area.

Crèche and/or playgroup

Halting site/group housing scheme Hotel, public house, restaurant, café Live/work units and small workshops Public service installation Retirement and/or nursing home.  

 

A total of 13.62 ha of land has been zoned for greenfield development within the Breagagh Valley Neighbourhood which is outside the built-up area.  This could deliver 476 housing units[7].  This Plan reserves land for two secondary schools and a primary school which are planned for the neighbourhood.  An area has also been reserved for neighbourhood uses and for open space provision in line with the original LAP for the area.

2.2.4 Loughmacask

A Local Area Plan was prepared for the Loughmacask area in 2008 and was extended until 2018.  A new masterplan is being prepared for the Loughmacask area to replace the LAP.  A public consultation exercise was held in Jan-Feb 2020 as part of the preparation of the Masterplan, with the publication of an Issues paper and a public meeting.  Following a pause due to the impact of Covid-19, work on the preparation of the Masterplan has recommenced.

Planning permission exists for approximately 300 houses in the area[8]  but no significant development has taken place in Loughmacask due to the lack of waste water infrastructure in the area and accessibility issues.  Some significant changes have occurred to the parameters of the area since the adoption of the original LAP such as:

  • The proposed relocation of the CBS secondary school to a site within the plan area
  • A significant proposed redevelopment of St. Canices’s primary school
  • A desire to further enhance the connectivity of the new neighbourhood back to the existing built up area.
  • A desire to integrate the existing and new road structures to maximise the integration of land use and transportation given the extent of contiguous boundary with the existing built up area.

In this regard, a preliminary report has been prepared with proposed options on the alignment of Phase 3 of the Central Access Scheme, incorporating enhanced connectivity to the existing built up area, and providing for the integration of the secondary school site.  A draft Masterplan will be published shortly for public consultation before finalisation in early 2021.

A total of 25.84 ha is zoned within the Loughmacask masterplan area which is outside the existing footprint of the built-up City.  This has the potential to deliver 904 housing units[9].  A site on the Dunningstown Road has been rezoned to Community Facilities, in order to accommodate the re-location of the CBS school from James’ Street during the plan period with an appropriate access solution to be delivered in the event of any planning application.

2.2.5 Development Strategy

The Core Strategy for the City has been outlined in Table 2.2 (City Core Strategy 2016-2027) above.  A total land requirement of 26.5 hectares of land is required to be zoned on greenfield areas for the plan period (2021-2027) to satisfy housing demand.

Under this plan it is proposed to zone a total of 39.46ha of land for residential development on greenfield lands outside of the built-up area, split between the two neighbourhoods of the Breagagh Valley and Loughmacask with 13.62ha and 25.84 ha allocated respectively. This is 12.96ha in excess of the requirement.

This excess is justified for the following reasons:

  • 15ha of the proposed land for housing is in the Loughmacask masterplan area which is subject to planning permission which are currently extant and could be activated[10]
  • All the lands are in areas of plan-led development
  • Development of the lands are subject to the provision of necessary infrastructure as set out in previous LAPs and carried through in successive Development Plans
  • There is a likelihood of the lands being serviced within the time frame of the Plan
  • The level of investment in enabling infrastructure and supporting amenities committed in the two neighbourhoods in the form of
    • The LIHAF scheme in the Breagagh Valley (roads and services and public open space)
    • Two secondary schools in the Breagagh Valley
    • A new primary school in the Breagagh Valley
    • The provision of a new secondary school in the Loughmacask area
    • The redevelopment of St. Canice’s primary school on the Granges road
  • The proximity of the lands to the existing built up area of the city
  • The redevelopment opportunities currently being delivered by the Council within the existing built form
    • The Abbey Quarter,
    • Housing units through the current house building programme
  • The availability of other services within a reasonable distance from the areas
  • The planned sustainable infrastructure to connect the neighbourhoods to the existing built up area.
  • The pent-up demand for household formation identified through the Housing Strategy[11]

Having regard to all these factors, and to the Council’s commitment to active land management, it is considered reasonable to zone the lands proposed for the period of the Plan.

The remaining 30% of the total housing demand will be directed to sites within the existing built up footprint of the City through active land management and infrastructure investment.

This distribution underpins a balanced, compact form for the City in line with the concept of the 10-minute city.  It also takes into account previous planning permissions in both neighbourhoods and is linked to proposed movement objectives in terms of walking, cycling potential public transport and the private car.  This approach is completely in line with the concept of plan led development.

It is compact in form, and combined with sustainable transport links between the various land uses, which will facilitate easier circulation and mobility within Kilkenny City, it is considered the strategy complies with the National Strategic Outcome of compact growth in the NPF[12].  The development strategy is designed to reinforce the City as a place for living, working, shopping and services.

 

2.3 Abbey Quarter Masterplan

The Abbey Quarter is an 8.25 hectares site within city centre.  It is a significant site which will enhance the City Centre by regenerating the former brewery site, with the delivery of mixed uses such as commercial, office, retail, residential, education, community and recreational.

It has the benefit of a Masterplan[13] and an Urban Design Code[14] and development has commenced on site with the refurbishment of the Brewhouse building, the linear park including a skate park and public realm upgrade.  In 2020 the Council applied to An Bord Pleanála for development of a new urban street through the Abbey Quarter and an urban park.  This will facilitate further development of the site.  In 2021 it is expected that work will commence on the refurbishment of the Mayfair building as a new County library. 

From start to significant delivery is an estimated period of 15 years.  The ultimate land use distribution is set out in the Urban Design Code but in the intervening period allowance is also made for ‘meanwhile uses’ which will assist in the transition from brownfield to mixed use development.

Objective

C2A        To continue to implement the Abbey Quarter Masterplan and Urban Design Code and secure the overall development of the area in accordance with their objectives

C2B        To monitor the implementation of the Abbey Quarter Masterplan and Urban Design Code at least every 12 months from the adoption of this Plan.

 

2.4 Future Masterplans

Notwithstanding the preparation of the neighbourhood plans for Breagagh Valley and Loughmacask, there are other opportunity areas in the city that have been identified for master planning exercises.

These areas are:

    • St Canice’s Campus on the Dublin Road at Lacken,
    • The Fair Green,
    • The former Mart Site
2.4.1 St. Canice’s

It was an objective of the 2014 Development Plan to prepare a masterplan/planning framework for the lands surrounding St. Canice’s hospital (St. Canice’s Campus).  Work on a masterplan commenced in 2019 and progressed to a stage ready for public consultation.  An Issues Paper was prepared and a public consultation event was scheduled for April 4th 2020.  Due to the emergence of Covid-19 and the national lockdown in March the public consultation was cancelled.  The disruption to public gatherings plus the impact on resources of the HSE and the County Council required suspension of the process.

Objective:

C2C        To complete the masterplanning process for St. Canice’s campus during the lifetime of the Plan in conjunction with the Health Services Executive.

 

2.4.2 Fair Green

The Fair Green area offers a potential opportunity for redevelopment.  There is a requirement to relocate the existing fire station and the Council’s yard area on the Gaol Road. This would result in significant amount of land being made available, and the site could be examined in conjunction with adjoining land in the ownership of the HSE and other publicly owned land.  The area is conveniently defined by Parnell Street, Kickham Street, Dominic Street and the Gaol Road.

Objective:

C2D        To complete a masterplan for the Fair Green area during the lifetime of the Plan.

2.4.3 Former Mart Site

The former mart site formed part of the City Centre Local Area Plan in 2008 and was earmarked for mixed use urban development.  In 2005 a planning application was lodged and refused for a large scale mixed use development on the site  (totalling 48,729 square metres gross floor area) incorporating retail/commercial uses, foodcourt, multi-plex cinema, leisure plex, office accommodation, primary healthcare centre, medical centre and residential units (24 number apartments).

Since that time a 10-screen multiplex cinema has been constructed on the Barrack Street end of the site.  The remaining area comprises approximately 3.4 hectares which requires a master-planning exercise and local planning framework to deal with movement, public realm, design and other issues that are best addressed at a neighbourhood level rather than at an individual site scale[15].  Due to its location, scale and form the site has the potential to be a location for a significant proportion of residential uses, and some higher buildings on a portion of the site in line with Government Guidelines[16].

The following specific site objective applies to the site.

C2E         Develop a masterplan for the former Mart (Ref Z10) site to deal inter alia with the mix of uses, movement, public realm, design, building heights etc.

 

2.5 Active Land Management

2.5.1 Vacant Sites

As part of the active land management strategy of the Council there are a number of significant sites within the City that will make a significant contribution to the growth of the City in a compact form. 

Through the Council’s active land management policy, a total of 14.8 hectares of vacant land has been identified within the built-up area of the City.  Applying an average density of 35 units per hectare, this land has the potential to deliver 490 residential units during the plan period. This alone is equivalent to 37% of the  overall City  growth targeted under the Core strategy.( see table 2.2 under Land Requirements))

 

2.5.2 Derelict sites & Vacant Homes

Compulsory Purchase Orders (CPOs) for the purchase of six derelict and vacant homes were issued in Kilkenny City and it is anticipated the process will be completed during the lifetime of the plan.

2.6 Previous City Centre Studies

 

2.6.1 City Centre Local Area Plan

The City Centre LAP was adopted by the Borough Council in 2005.  The City Centre LAP has expired, but notwithstanding this, the Council will continue to implement the following provisions.

The City Centre Local Area Plan acknowledged the added dynamism and interest that particular non‐retail uses, specifically cafes, restaurants, public houses and bars (but excluding fast food outlets) can bring to a retail centre.  However, there is a need to strike a balance between the need to maintain the dominant role of the retail function of the city centre and the wider aim of increasing the city centre population and protecting the amenities of existing residents. The Local Area Plan states that such uses will be encouraged to locate in the area but should be dispersed to prevent a clustering and that a high quality of design should be achieved.

Policy P.L.U.4 of the Local Area Plan states:

The Council will have regard to the following considerations in the assessment of applications for change of use in the retail core:

  • The number and proximity of similar uses already operating in the immediate area.
  • The scale of the proposed outlet.
  • The physical impact of the proposed use on the internal structure of the building in which it will be located.
  • The quality of the shopfront design and associated signage.
  • The relevant Specific Objectives of this Local Area Plan in respect of inappropriate land uses and the public realm.

For public house and entertainment use, the Council will control the location, size and activities of entertainment uses that are likely to attract significant numbers of people, in particular public houses with large floor areas with or without other entertainment and night clubs, in order to safeguard the general amenity, environmental quality, residential amenity, character and function of the area. In applications for such developments the onus will be on the applicant to demonstrate that the proposed new entertainment use, or extension to existing use or variation in opening hours would not cause harm to general amenity, environmental quality, residential amenity or the established character and function of the area.

Section 2 of the City Centre Local Area Plan contains a development strategy for the city centre consisting of traffic management and urban design policies. The Council will continue to implement the provisions of section 2 of the LAP relating to transport, car parking, urban design and land uses.

In the interests of clarity where a conflict arises between the original LAP document and the adopted Development Plan then the Development Plan will take precedence.

2.7 Employment Land

As part of the development strategy, the major employment areas are shown on Figure CS2 Core Strategy.  These are located south of the N10 Ring Road at Smithsland, at Joinersfolly, Loughboy and Danville, the Hebron Road, Purcellsinch and a Business Park zoning at Leggestrath.  These land banks are strategically located close to existing transportation corridors such as the N9/N10, the Ring Road extension and the N10 motorway link.

In all, a total of approximately 167ha (412 acres) of greenfield land is available in the various business and industrial zones.  South of the N9/N10 at Smithsland, Joinersfolly, Loughboy and Danville is a strategic parcel of lands that can cater for Enterprise, Business and Technology parks for Foreign Direct Investment through the IDA and quality industrial lands catering for small and medium enterprises. In this area there are 106 acres of greenfield uncommitted land available for development.  There is also a further 25 acres of zoned land where permission has been granted for 21 serviced industrial sites.  With increasing intensity of development in these areas, movement to and from these locations can be problematic particularly at peak times due to limited forms of alternative transport to the car.

There is a requirement to develop a link from the IDA lands/Bohernatounish Road to the Waterford Road to provide for alternative access points for all modes of transport.

2.8 Other opportunity sites

To enable brownfield/opportunity site development within the city, outside of those areas specified above, planning policies and standards will be flexibly applied, focusing on design-led and performance-based outcomes, rather than specifying absolute requirements in all cases.  

In particular, general restrictions on building height or universal standards for car parking or garden size may not be applicable in all circumstances in the City and in appropriate situations, performance-based criteria may be applied.  For example, in relation to car parking, in central sites some relaxation may be applied to the car parking standards as the provision of car parking in the vicinity may service the development sufficiently. 

2.8.1 Hebron Road

In order to stimulate re‐development along the Hebron Road, a Mixed-Use zoning was introduced for that area in the 2008 – 2014 Development Plan.  This was in recognition of the anticipated completion of the M10 Motorway project resulting in the Hebron Road becoming one of the direct entrance points to the city.  The historical land uses along the Hebron Road do not reflect or promote the future role of this road as an entrance corridor to the city.  A limited amount of redevelopment has taken place but there is considerable road frontage to be redeveloped. It is considered appropriate therefore to continue this Mixed-Use zoning.  An Urban Design Strategy[17] was completed for the Hebron Road in 2017.

Any development that takes place along this corridor will have to reflect and promote the role of the Hebron Road as an entrance corridor to the city and reflect the objectives of the Urban Design Strategy.  This will require a high quality built environment.

Objective:

C2F     To implement the Urban Design Strategy for the Hebron Road as resources permit and as redevelopment opportunities arise.

​​​​​​​2.9 Zoning Objectives for Kilkenny City

The purpose of zoning is to indicate to property owners and the general public the type of development which the Planning Authority considers most appropriate in each land use category. Zoning is designed to reduce conflicting uses within areas, to protect resources and, in association with phasing, to create a basis for investment in public and private infrastructure and facilities thereby ensuring that land suitable for development is used to the best advantage of the community as a whole. (See Figure CS5 City Zoning Objectives.)

Zoning policy must also have regard to the strategic policies underlying the Development Plan.  These include the principles of sustainable development, the integration of land use and transportation planning, the concept of the compact city, the neighbourhood strategy and the protection of natural resources.

The zoning strategy is designed to ensure that adequate, suitably located and serviced land is available to cater for the orderly development of the City and Environs having regard to:

  • The need to deliver a compact urban form for the City & Environs and reduce urban sprawl
  • The need to deliver the concept of the 10-Minute City
  • The need to reduce reliance on private transport and increase cycling and walking
  • The maintenance of a clear line between the built‐up urban area and the rural area
  • The promotion of sustainable residential densities in the City
  • The promotion of balanced development between different areas of the City
  • The promotion of the neighbourhood concept
  • The maintenance of a vibrant and vital city centre

In this section:

  • Permitted Use means a use which is acceptable in the relevant zone. However, it is still the subject of the normal planning process. Uses listed under each zoning objective are generally acceptable in principle in the relevant zones. The schedule of Permitted Uses is intended as a guideline in assessing development proposals and should not be regarded as being exhaustive.
  • Open for Consideration means a use which may be permitted where the Planning Authority is satisfied that the suggested form of development will be compatible with the policies and objectives for the zone, and will not conflict with the permitted uses and also conforms with the proper planning and development of the area.
2.9.1  Areas of Strategic Reserve

Areas of Strategic Reserve are included on the zoning map of Kilkenny City (See Figure CS5).  These areas will provide for the expansion of the city beyond the period of this Plan (post 2027).  Following substantial progress being made in the development of the Breagagh and Loughmacask neighbourhoods, appropriate planning framework documents will be prepared for some of the areas of Strategic Reserve as required in the longer term.

Objective: To conserve and protect Strategic Reserve land from interference from non‐agricultural uses. To prevent premature development of agricultural land adjacent to development areas.

Permitted Uses: Agriculture, horticulture, public service installations.

Open for Consideration: Public Open Space, guesthouse, restaurant, dwelling houses in certain limited cases, as outlined below, halting site, private open space, other uses not contrary to the proper planning and development of the area, extensions to existing developments.

Housing on Strategic Reserve lands:

Housing will be restricted to the following categories of persons: 

Immediate members of farmers’ families (sons/daughters) where the land is being actively farmed by that family.

The basis of this policy is to preserve the existing agricultural use of the areas zoned for Strategic Reserve.  At present there are a number of uses operating within this area, and extensions and expansions of these uses will be considered on their own merits, where they will not jeopardise the longer-term strategic use of the land. 

Flood Risk: All proposed development within this zone which falls within flood zone A or B shall be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. No highly vulnerable uses (as set out in the Flood Risk Management Guidelines) other than extensions to existing structures and uses, will be permitted within Flood Zone A or B. Less vulnerable uses will also not be allowed within Flood Zone A other than extensions to existing structures and uses as set out in the Flood Risk Management guidelines.

​​​​​​​2.9.2 Existing Low Density Residential

Objective: To protect, provide and improve residential amenities at low density. Low density housing is defined as not more than 10 units per ha (4 per acre) on average and must have regard to the character of the area.

Permitted Uses: Dwellings, open spaces, places of worship, community facilities, halting sites, public service installations, childcare facility, nursing homes, Bed and breakfast establishments and guesthouses, home‐based economic activity, parks and open spaces, playing fields, local convenience shop, nursing homes, and medical centre.

Open for Consideration: public house, hotel, restaurant.

2.9.3 Existing Residential

Objective: To protect, provide and improve residential amenities.

Permitted Uses: Dwellings, open spaces, places of worship, community facilities, halting sites, public service installations, childcare facility, nursing homes, Bed and breakfast establishments and guesthouses, home‐based economic activity, parks and open spaces, playing fields, local convenience shop, nursing homes, and medical centre.

Open for Consideration: Public house, hotel, restaurant, temporary car park*.

*’temporary’ is defined as no longer than 5 years from the date of permission granted unless a sustainable case can be put forward for a further extension.

2.9.4 New Residential

Objective: To protect, provide and improve residential amenities.

Permitted Uses: Dwellings, open spaces, places of worship, community facilities, halting sites, public service installations, childcare facility, nursing homes, Bed and breakfast establishments and guesthouses, home‐based economic activity, parks and open spaces, playing fields, local convenience shop, nursing homes, and medical centre.

Open for Consideration: public house, hotel, restaurant.

2.9.5 General Business

Objective: To provide for general development.

Permissible Uses:

Dwellings, retailing, retail warehousing, wholesale outlets, offices, public buildings or places of assembly, cultural or educational buildings, recreational buildings, halting sites, hotels, motels, guest houses, clubs, private garages, open spaces, public service installations, medical and related consultants, restaurants, public houses, coffee shops/cafes, petrol stations, car parks, halls or discotheques, and other uses as permitted and open for consideration in residential zoning.

Uses outlined in the Abbey Quarter masterplan and Urban Design Code within the Abbey Quarter area.

Open for Consideration: open space, workshop or light industry.

2.9.6 Neighbourhood Centre

Objective: To provide for local shopping, non-retail services, community and social needs.

Permitted Uses: Supermarket (for local neighbourhood needs), newsagents, car park, office above street level, place of worship, library, public building or place of assembly, cultural or recreational facility, leisure centre, medical consultancy, playgroup or crèche, restaurant, public house, hotel/ motel, guest house, coffee shop, travel agents.

Open for Consideration: open space, workshop or light industry above street level, off license, residential.

​​​​​​​2.9.7 Amenity / Green links/Biodiversity conservation/ Open Space/Recreation

Objective: To allow for green links and biodiversity conservation and to preserve, provide and improve recreational open space.

Permitted Uses: Open space, sports clubs, recreational buildings, stands, pavilions, agricultural uses, halting site, and public service installations.

Flood Risk: All proposed development within this zone which falls within flood zone A or B shall be subject to a site-specific flood risk assessment. No highly vulnerable uses (as set out in the Flood Risk Management Guidelines) other than extensions to existing structures and uses, will be permitted within Flood Zone A or B. Less vulnerable uses will also not be allowed within Flood Zone A other than extensions to existing structures and uses as set out in the Flood Risk Management guidelines.

2.9.8 Community Facilities

Objective: To protect, provide and improve community facilities.

Permitted Uses: Educational facilities, incubator businesses linked to established third level facilities, religious and cultural facilities, public buildings, churches, hospitals, convents, community centres and halls, school playing fields, hostels, halting sites, cemeteries, libraries, public service installations and nursing homes*.

*In the case of St. Kieran’s College, employment use was established under planning ref. 17/836.  There has been no perceptible negative impact on the educational uses within the college.  It is considered that employment use here can be considered as acceptable in principle provided there is a clear demonstration that the education uses on the campus are not impinged.  A site-specific objective is included on Figure CS5 City Zoning. 

2.9.9 Industrial/Warehousing

Objective: To provide for industrial employment and related uses.

Permitted Uses: General industrial uses and ancillary offices, open spaces, warehouses, car and heavy vehicle parks, petrol filling stations, civic amenity/recycling centre, local convenience shop, Automated teller machines, car showrooms, advertisement structures, wholesale premises, public service installations, play school/crèche, repair garages, telecommunications structure, waste transfer stations, single retail warehousing units (excluding retail warehousing parks).

Open for Consideration: Science and technology-based industry, restaurant, halting sites, recreational use/buildings.

2.9.10 Industrial/ Technology Park

Objective: To provide for industry and information technology‐related industrial and office development and ancillary services. The purpose is to encourage mainly services type employment on a campus environment.

Permitted Uses: Industrial premises and office based industry, car parks, crèches, local convenience shop, Automated teller machines, open spaces, warehouses, third level education and research.

Open for consideration: recreational use/buildings, public service installations and conference facilities, restaurant, waste transfer stations.

2.9.11 Business Park

Objective: To provide for commercial activity including industry, information technology‐related industrial and office development and ancillary services and retail warehousing.

Permitted Uses: Car park, park and ride facility, childcare facility, community facility, enterprise centre, funeral home, light industry, medical and related consultants, office based industry, science and technology based industry, car showrooms, local convenience shop of not more than 100m2 (gross), automated teller machines, restaurant, conference facilities, public service installations, hotel, warehousing, including retail warehousing[18].

Open for consideration: recreational use/buildings, public service installations and waste transfer stations.

Not Permitted: retailing other than retail warehousing

Where permission is granted for retail warehousing, conditions will be attached restricting the sale of goods to bulky goods as defined in the plan and restricting the size of individual units. The Council will take enforcement action against developers to ensure compliance with these conditions.

​​​​​​​2.9.12 Mixed Use

Objective: To consolidate and facilitate the development of inner suburban sites for mixed use development which will allow for commercial and residential uses.

Permitted Uses: Dwellings, open spaces, places of worship, community facilities, halting sites, nursing homes, Bed and breakfast establishments and guesthouses, home‐based economic activity, parks and open spaces, playing fields, car park, park and ride facility, childcare facility, community facility, enterprise centre, funeral home, light industry, medical and related consultants, office based industry, science and technology based industry, local convenience shop, automated teller machines, restaurant, conference facilities, public service installations, hotel, warehousing, including retail warehousing, discount food store, petrol station.

Open for Consideration: recreational use/buildings, waste transfer stations and public house.

2.9.13 Agricultural Trade

Objective: To develop a centre of excellence and one stop shop for agricultural related trade and activities with an emphasis on high value added activities, by providing for and improvement of agricultural trade, related uses and ancillary activities and services and to provide for industrial employment and related uses.

Permitted Uses: Livestock market, and related uses and agricultural trade, agricultural science and technology based industry, local convenience shop, automated teller machines, restaurant, Farm/agricultural business, farm advisory business, veterinary suppliers, veterinary practitioners, general industrial uses and ancillary offices, open spaces, warehouses, car and heavy vehicle parks, petrol filling stations, civic amenity/recycling centre, car showrooms, advertisement structures, wholesale premises, play school/crèche, repair garages, telecommunications structure, public service installations, waste transfer stations, garden centre.

Not Permitted: the sale of higher order comparison goods as found in town centres, significant levels of non‐agricultural related‐office/commercial development. The total of industrial and related uses should not extend to more than 40% of the entire floor area of buildings on site.

2.9.14 Urban Agriculture:

Objective: To provide for agricultural uses within the existing foot print of the built-up area and to protect the land from non-agricultural uses and provide for sustainable agricultural/horticulture uses within the urban context..

Permissible uses: Agriculture, horticulture, Agricultural structures related to on site production, allotments

Flood Risk: All proposed development within this zone which falls within flood zone A or B shall be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. No highly vulnerable uses (as set out in the Flood Risk Management Guidelines) other than extensions to existing structures and uses, will be permitted within Flood Zone A or B. Less vulnerable uses will also not be allowed within Flood Zone A other than extensions to existing structures and uses as set out in the Flood Risk Management guidelines.

​​​​​​​2.9.15 Agriculture

Objective: To conserve and protect agricultural land from interference from non-agricultural uses.  To prevent development of agricultural land adjacent to development areas. 

Permissible uses: Agriculture, horticulture, public service installations

Open for consideration: Public open space, guesthouse, restaurant, nursing home, dwelling houses in certain limited cases, halting site, private open space

Housing on lands zoned Agriculture:

Housing on lands zoned “Agriculture” will be restricted to the following categories of persons:

  • Immediate members of farmer’s families (sons /daughters) and/or;
  • Person whose primary employment is in agriculture, horticulture, forestry or bloodstock, or other rural based activity in the area in which they wish to build)

Flood Risk: All proposed development within this zone which falls within flood zone A or B shall be subject to a site specific flood risk assessment. No highly vulnerable uses (as set out in the Flood Risk Management Guidelines) other than extensions to existing structures and uses, will be permitted within Flood Zone A or B. Less vulnerable uses will also not be allowed within Flood Zone A other than extensions to existing structures and uses as set out in the Flood Risk Management guidelines.

2.9.16 Non- Conforming Uses

Throughout the City and Environs there are uses which do not conform to the zoning objectives for the area. Extensions and improvement of premises accommodating these uses may be permitted where the proposed development would not seriously injure the amenities of the area or prejudice the proper planning and development of the area. In some cases, the Planning Authority may encourage relocation of permitted incompatible uses.

2.9.17 Transitional Areas

While the zoning objectives indicate the different uses permitted in each zone, it is important to avoid abrupt transitions in scale and use at the boundary of adjoining land use zones. In these areas, it is necessary that developments are designed in a manner which would not be detrimental to the amenities of the more environmentally sensitive zone.  For instance, in zones abutting residential areas particular attention must be paid to the uses, scale, density and appearance of development proposals and to landscaping and screening proposals in order to protect the amenities of these residential areas.

2.9.18 City Zoning Map Objectives

Z1:  Robertshill Mixed Use Zoning

  1. No vehicular connection to be permitted between the Central Access Scheme and Kennyswell Road through the site.
  2. Public open space to be provided along the Breagagh River, to form part of the Breagagh Regional Park.
  3. Any residential component of the site to be readily accessible from the parklands.
  4. An overall Framework Plan of the entire site shall be submitted at planning application stage.
  5. Any development on the site must have due regard to the amenities of existing residences.

Z2: Bleach Road Woolen Mills

The Council will consider development proposals which provide for:

  • securing a sustainable use of the protected structures,
  • protection of the River Nore SAC and
  • securing the objectives for the creation of the River Nore Linear park

Z3: Waterford Road

The development of the lands located on the Waterford Road (known as the Murphy machinery lands) to be dependent on an alternative access to the national route.

Z4: St. Canice’s Campus (See Section 2.2.6.1 St. Canice’s)

To work with the HSE and other relevant stakeholders in the preparation of a Masterplan for the most appropriate land uses.  Such a plan shall take account of all the existing land uses and future demands of the HSE and develop a framework for appropriate land uses and urban design criteria for the lands and shall include for significant elements of open space, recreational uses as appropriate, residential and a recognition of the existing employment uses on site including office.

Z5: Waterford Road, Nuncio Road and Bohernatounish Road

Having regard to the location of the land at the junction of Waterford Road (Regional Road), and Nuncio Road and notwithstanding the development of a discount retail store and permission of opticians on the lands and having regard to residential zoning on the site, and the extent of commercial development in the area, further development at this location should be predominantly residential with the majority of uses (in square metres) being residential in nature.

Z6: MacDonagh Railway Station and MacDonagh Junction

To promote a pedestrian/cycling connectivity between the railway station and the mixed-use centre and to promote connectivity between these uses and the city centre along the former railway line and St. Francis bridge.

Z7: Granges Road and the future Loughmacask village centre

Provide pedestrian and cycle access through the lands around the former Ayrfield House between the Granges Road and the future Loughmacask village centre.  The pedestrian and cycle route should be located within an open space area equivalent to a minimum of 10% of the total residential development area.  The open space shall be designed in accordance with principles set out in the Urban Design Manual and the Development Plan.

Z8: Loughmacask (See Section 2.2.4 Loughmacask)

To complete the masterplan for the Loughmacask area which will replace the former Local Area Plan.  

Z9: Fair Green (See Section 2.2.6.2 Fair Green)

To complete the masterplan for the Fair Green area within the life time of the plan. 

Z10: Former Mart site (See Section 2.2.7.2 Former Mart site)

Prior to further development of the former Mart site, to prepare a masterplan for the area to deal inter alia with the mix of uses, movement, public realm, design, building heights etc.

Z11 St. Kieran’s College

To acknowledge the St. Kieran’s College campus as a hub for innovation and creative employment uses.  Further expansion of these uses will be considered, whilst ensuring that the primary educational use is maintained and residential amenity in the area is not adversely affected. 

2.9.19 Public Realm Improvements

Objectives for Public realm improvements

C2G        To improve the public realm and introduce mobility/smarter travel options and shared spaces along High Street and Rose Inn Street; (A on Figure CS3)

C2H        To upgrade the streetscape and public realm along Ormonde Street to include provision of a new one-way system; (B on Figure CS3)

C2I          To upgrade the streetscape along the pedestrianised St Kieran’s Street and the laneways and slips that connect it with High Street; (C on Figure CS3)

C2J         To upgrade the streetscape and laneways in the St Mary’s Precinct; (D on Figure CS3)

C2K        To upgrade the public realm in Carnegie Plaza and the streetscape along Barrack Lane, linking to John Street. (E on Figure CS3)

The Council will investigate and make provision for sustainable transport connections to and from the significant employment areas of the city including Smithlands/Danville, Purcells Inch/Leggestrath, St. Luke’s hospital.

The Council will support the delivery of the infrastructural requirements identified for Kilkenny City including the delivery of the northern extension of the ring road from the N77 Castlecomer Road to the R693 Freshford Rd as part of the western by-pass, subject to required feasibility, planning and environmental assessment processes.

The implementation of the above Movement and mobility objectives will add significantly to the quality of the public realm within the city.

  Figure CS3: Key Public Spaces of Kilkenny City

 

[1] RSES RPO 11 page 46

[2] 10-minute travel trip by cycle or walking or public transport.

[3] 3,641 divided by 2.75 persons per unit = 1,324 households, divided by 35units/hectare = 37.8 hectares

[4] 30% of 37.8 is 11.3ha

[5] RSES page 46, RPO 11a

[6] Footprint as defined by the CSO 2016 census

[7] 13.6ha x 35 units /ha= 476

[8] Planning reg ref P10/10 and P10/15

[9] 25.84hax35 units/ha=904

[10] Planning reg ref P10/10 and P10/15

[11] Housing Strategy, Appendix B

[12] National Planning Outcome 1 Compact Growth p14

[13] Kilkenny County Council, Urban Design Framework Masterplan for Abbey Creative Quarter, Kilkenny, 2015

[14] Kilkenny County Council, Abbey Quarter Urban Design Code, 2018

[15] Urban Development and Building Heights Guidelines for Planning Authorities December 2018

[16] ibid

[17] Kilkenny County Council, Hebron Road Urban Design Strategy, 2017

[18] Retail warehousing is defined as large single level stores specialising in the sale of bulky household goods or goods sold in bulk. Bulky Goods to be defined as:

  • Goods generally sold from retail warehouses where DIY goods or goods, such as flatpack furniture are of such a size that they would normally be taken away by car and not manageable by customers travelling by foot, cycle or bus or that large floor areas would be required to display them e.g. furniture in room sets, or not large individually but part of a collective purchase which would be bulky e.g. wallpaper and paint. In the interests of clarity this definition excludes such items as non‐durable household goods, alcoholic and non‐alcoholic beverages, tobacco, food, and small personal and household items.

 

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